Lego Challenge #22: Build a Craftsman style home

Today’s challenge: Build a detailed Craftsman-style home using Lego

Craftsman Style

There are a lot of Craftsman style homes here in the Seattle area, especially in the suburban communities within Seattle city limits. Many were kit homes that you could order as a pre-cut set of lumber with instructions from Sears and other companies. I like the style a lot, particularly on these authentic smaller homes. (Modern McMansions in the style have way too many gables for my liking.)

A variety of Craftsman style homes (from historichouseblog.com)

A variety of Craftsman style homes (from historichouseblog.com)

My Project

For my project, I wanted to have roofs at multiple pitches, as this is common of the style. That said, I needed to recognize the limits of the building material, so I avoided having one gable go north/south and the other go east/west. The stacked roof-lines I used is common, and frequently employed to give a home a second story or increase the height of existing second story rooms.

Front of my Craftsman home.

Front of my Craftsman home.

I also spent time coming up with some style-appropriate lighting fixtures, which went on the porch and sides of the home.

Profile view highlights the three levels of roof-line.

Profile view highlights the three levels of roof-line.

I used 1×2 Technic pinned pieces to create hinges and attach the sloped roof sections together. This is another part not included in the Architecture Studio set which I used anyways.

Underside of roof modules.

Underside of roof modules.

The house I built is nearly large enough for minifigure-scale, given that the doorway is 4 studs tall.

Conclusion

Getting the three roof-lines right was a chore, but the final project looks great. One of my best builds yet. And yes, I am definitely hitting the upper-bounds on size of projects feasible with this set. I used almost all my bricks and all my 1×1, 1×2, 1×3 and 1×4 plates. (I was completely out of 1×2 jumpers even after adding 25 more to my set.)

project time: 1.5 hours.

Today’s post is part of my Lego Architecture Studio 30-day Challenge

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2 Responses

  1. Quacs says:

    Tom, I really love this one too. If you lived in Chicago, this could double as a typical “Chicago Bungalow” as well, although if you wanted another challenge, you could try a side entrance like a number of Chicago Bungalows have.

  2. john says:

    hi,
    do you have instructions or detailed image (and parts used) on how you created the sloped roof using plates? Thanks

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